135.7 – 137.8 kHz

the 2200 meter band

IARU Spectrum Requirement

At WRC-07 IARU succeeded to fulfil its requirement for a worldwide, shared LF allocation below 200 kHz.

Considerations

This frequency range has characteristics quite unlike those of higher frequencies, and there is considerable interest in LF propagation and experimentation by individuals.

Situation in Region 1

Co-ordinated efforts by IARU Region 1 led to the adoption in May 1997 by the CEPT European Radiocommunications Committee of Recommendation 62-01:

CEPT REC 62-01

This frequency range has characteristics quite unlike those of higher frequencies, and there is considerable interest in LF propagation and experimentation by individuals. At the present time, there is no ITU global or regional allocation to the amateur service in the low-frequency (LF) band. Co-ordinated efforts by IARU Region 1 led to the adoption in May 1997 by the CEPT European Radiocommunications Committee of Recommendation 62-01:

“1) that the band 135.7 – 137.8 kHz may be used with a maximum e.r.p. of 1 watt on a secondary basis by the Amateur Service in CEPT countries.”

The status of implementation is as follows

Country
Implementation according to ERO
Implementation according to other sources
Albania
No info

Andorra
No info
URA: yes
Austria
Yes
Frequenznutzungsplan and Amateurfunkgesetzes
Azerbaijan


Belarus

BFRR: yes 1 Watt ERP
Belgium
No info
National Allocation Table
Bosnia & Herzegovina
No info
Not in National Allocation Table
Bulgaria
Yes
National Frequency Plan. National Footnote 71
Croatia

Planned www.nn.hr
Cyprus
No info
CARS: yes
Czech Republic
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote CZ3
Denmark
No info
National Frequency Plan
Estonia
Yes
National Radio Frequency Allocation Plan
Finland
Yes
National Frequency Plan
France
No info
National Allocation Table Footnote F002a
FY Rep of Macedonia


Germany
No info
Frequenzbereichszuweisungsplan. Footnote 3
Greece
No info
Hungary
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote H10
Iceland
Yes
National Table of Frequency Allocations
Ireland
No info
Not in National Allocation Table. Special permits reported
Italy
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote 8
Latvia

Special permits reported
Liechtenstein

National Allocation Table
Lithuania
Yes
National Radio Frequency Allocation Table
Luxemburg

Plan d'allocation, d'attribution et d'assignation des fréquences
Malta

permitted since 01.01.09
Moldova

ARM: no
Monaco

ARM: yes
Netherlands
Yes
Nationaal Frequentie Plan
Norway
Yes
National Allocation Table
Poland

National Allocation Table National Footnote POL.1
Portugal
Planned
Under consideration due to a revision of National Legislations
Romania

FRR: no
Russian Federation

San Marino


Serbia & Montenegro

Not in National Allocation Table
Slovak Republic

National Table of Frequency Allocations
Slovenia

ATRP: Table of Amateur Bands
Spain
Yes
Cuadro Nacional de Atribución de Frecuencias. National Footnote UN-108
Sweden
No info
PTSFS 2001:4
Switzerland
No info
National Frequency Allocation Plan
Turkey
No
Not in National Allocation Table
Ukraine


United Kingdom
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote UK7
Vatican City
No info

 

Situation in Region 2

Argentina, Canada and the United States have issued experimental licenses in the band 135.7–137.8 kHz.

Some administrations issue experimental licenses to amateurs or otherwise permit LF low-power operation; for example, in 160–190 kHz in the USA.

In a spectrum study, the USA administration approved, in principle, an ARRL requirement for a shared allocation in the vicinity of 160–190 kHz. Subsequently, the ARRL petitioned the FCC for secondary allocations in the bands 135.7–137.8 kHz and 160–190 kHz. In 2002, the FCC issued a Notice of Proposed Rule Making requesting public comment on a proposal to allocate the band 135.7–137.8 kHz to the amateur service while not proposing allocation of the band 160–190 kHz. In 2003, the FCC issued a Report and Order on several spectrum allocations for the Amateur Services but declined to allocate the band 135.7-137.8 kHz. There was substantial opposition to an amateur LF allocation from power companies which alleged that amateur transmissions would cause harmful interference to power-line carrier systems operating in that frequency range. However, the FCC did offer the possibility of authorising a number of experimental licenses.

Domestically in the USA, studies continue on compatibility of the Amateur Service with power-line carrier communications in the band 135.7-137.8 kHz including testing on an experimental license basis.

Region 2 (Guatemala City, 2001) urged its member-societies to support a coordinated approach to secondary allocations to the Amateur Service in the bands 135.7-137.8 kHz and 160-190 kHz.

In CITEL, Canada introduced an Inter-American Proposal to WRC-03 for a similar allocation by footnote in Region 2. Instead, WRC-03 decided to establish agenda item 1.15 for WRC-07, which reads:

1.15 to consider a secondary allocation to the amateur service in the frequency band 135.7-137.8 kHz.

 

Situation in Region 3

Australia and New Zealand have issued experimental licenses in the band 135.7–137.8 kHz.

Some administrations issue experimental licenses to amateurs or otherwise permit LF low-power operation; for example, in 165–190 kHz in Australia. In New Zealand in 1990, after negotiations by NZART, the band 165–190 kHz became available to radio amateurs with a special permit. In 2001 the permit requirement was removed and the band is now listed as an amateur band.

Region 3 (Darwin, 2000) recommended that an LF band segment of 15 kHz between 165 and 190 kHz and/or 135.7-137.8 kHz be sought through local administrations throughout Region 3 noting the international communications experiments that have taken and could take place. Region 3 (Taipei, 2004) updated this recommendation, referring to “in the vicinity of 180 kHz” instead of 165-190 kHz.