ARSPEX

ARISS Contact requests for 2018

To the IARU Region 1 Member Societies ARISS wishes to shorten the waiting time for a school conversation with an astronaut or a cosmonaut on board the International Space Station. Candidate schools are invited to submit an Application in the period February – April 2017. Selected schools can expect to benefit from an ARISS contact in the period February 2018 - June 2018.   IARU Region 1 Member Societies are invited to publish the information “ARISS School Contacts – Call for Candidate Schools” in their magazine as soon as possible, during the months preceding the Application period and starting from January 2017.   The idea is to reach schools that could be interested in setting up an ARISS School Contact. A good approach would be to publish the announcement in educational magazines that are distributed to teachers in several countries. It is also possible to submit the information to the ministry of education.   The text of the press release is hereto appended. Thank you for your support. 73, Stefan Dombrowski – ON6TI ARSPEX W.G. chairman Press Release   ARISS School Contacts – Call for Candidate Schools   Schools interested in an educational space conversation with an astronaut/cosmonaut on board the International Space Station are invited to submit an Application. ARISS-Europe will collect Applications from schools in Europe, Africa and the Middle East during three months: February, March and April 2017. The Application form is available at: http://www.ariss-eu.org/schoolcontacts.htm Please download the “ARISS_Application_Form” in the left side column of the webpage. The Application is to be submitted by e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Together with the Application, the school is invited to present a space oriented educational project. The Applications will be examine in May 2017. Schools will be select for an ARISS radio contact with an astronaut or a cosmonaut on board the International Space Station in the following school year, during the period February – June 2018. More details are available here: http://www.ariss-eu.org/school-contacts Thank you for circulating this information to interested schools. Emanuele D’Andria – IØELE ARISS-Europe chairman

First ARISS contact with HAMTV

A world first!

Thursday 11 February 2016, at 18:11 UTC, an educational ARISS radio contact took place at the Royal Masonic School for Girls, Rickmansworth, United Kingdom. The school contact was operated by Tim Peake, KG5BVI in the frame of the Principia mission.It was a historic event: the radio contact was enhanced with video! Tim Peake activated the Ham Video transmitter on board Columbus.

As far back as the year 2000, a proposal for an ATV system on the International Space Station was submitted to the ARISS Project Selection and Use Committee by Graham Shirville G3VZV. November 2002, a request for amateur radio facilities on the then under construction Columbus module was submitted by Gaston Bertels, ON4WF to Mr Jörg Feustel-Büechl, Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity Directorate of the European Space Agency (ESA). The request was to install wideband amateur radio antennas on the nadir of Columbus, facing the earth. With such antennas, the on board amateur radio facilities could be extended to amateur TV.

In 2003 the request was examined in detail and finally accepted. ARISS would pay for the development, manufacturing and qualification of the antennas. ESA would support he installation cost. ARISS-Europe started a funding campaign, all donations being published on the website. In 2004 coaxial feed throughs were installed on the port cone of Columbus. This was needed for accessing the antennas with feedlines from inside the module.In 2005, the Royal Belgian Amateur Radio Society (UBA) signed a contract with the Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland for the development and manufacturing of the antennas. Whereas initial plans were for UHF, L-band and S-band antennas, only L-and S-band antennas could be ordered by lack of funding. The cost of the project was 47.000 Euro.

Early 2006 the antennas were delivered to ESA. Meanwhile main Columbus contractor EADS and subcontractor Alenia Spazio had reviewed mechanical and thermal constraints. Wroclaw University proceeded to qualifications tests (cost 3.000 Euro) and the antennas failed. In 2007 an additional contract was signed with the Wroclaw University for the development of modified antennas. This amounted to 36.000 Euro. These antennas were accepted and installed on Columbus, October 2007.The cost of the antennas finally amounted to 86.000 Euro and was covered by a wordwide funding campaign. ESA supported the total installation cost of the antennas, including feed throughs and coaxial cables. After the successful launch of Columbus and its integration into the International Space Station complex, an ARISS-Europe working group started a study for the development of an amateur television transmitter on Columbus, using one of the the S-band antennas.

A debate started between the supporters of analog television (ATV) and the proponents of digital television (DATV). The working group, which met monthly per teleconference, made progress, but was stuck by the lack of funding.As time went by, the debate on ATV versus DATV evolved at the advantage of the latter, but no funding was in sight... Then, suddenly, supported by the enthusiasm of Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA, who had performed many ARISS school contacts during his 2010 - 2011 expedition aboard the Space Station, at the initiative of AMSAT Italia, an Italian manufacturer, Kayser Italia, presented a project for an amateur radio DATV transmitter to ESA’s educational services. In 2012, this proposal was accepted and ESA signed a contract with Kayser Italia for the development and the manufacturing of a DATV transmitter on S-band. This transmitter, dubbed “Ham Video, was installed on Columbus and ESA transferred the custodianship of this equipment to ARISS. It was a long way, spanning sixteen years, from the initial proposal to the firstever HamTV school contact. A new era opens for ground station operators, interested in receiving digital amateur television from the International Space Station. A technical challenge already met by a few ground stations in Europe, USA and Australia. Long life to HamTV and success to the pioneering ground stations, world wide!

73, Gaston Bertels, ON4WF ARISS-Europe past chairman

ARISS achieved its 1000's contact

ARISS is proud to announce the 1000th contact with space.ARISS was formed to allow students of every age to ask questions to astronauts in space using simple radioamateur means.Over the last 16 years, these contacts have enabled students to ask many questions, pushing forward interest and motivation in S.T.E.M.The amateur community has demonstrated that they can achieve a very high degree in reliability and professionalism in offering such contacts.Thanks to all those volunteers the mark of 1000 contacts has been reached, and with Tim Peake currently on board of ISS we hope for many more contacts. Further information on the ARISS programme on www.ariss-eu.org.You can also watch https://youtu.be/DwtLkTpgNMM 73's ON6TI

HamTV school contact – a world first!

HamTV school contact – a world first! Thursday 11 February 2016, at 18:11 UTC, an educational ARISS radio contact took place at the Royal Masonic School for Girls, Rickmansworth,, United Kingdom. The school contact was operated by Tim Peake, KG5BVI in the frame of the Principia mission. It was a historic event: the radio contact was enhanced with video! Tim Peake activated the Ham Video transmitter on board Columbus. As far back as the year 2000, a proposal for an ATV system on the International Space Station was submitted to the ARISS Project Selection and Use Committee by Graham Shirville G3VZV. November 2002, a request for amateur radio facilities on the then under construction Columbus module was submitted by Gaston Bertels, ON4WF to Mr Jörg Feustel-Büechl, Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity Directorate of the European Space Agency (ESA). The request was to install wideband amateur radio antennas on the nadir of Columbus, facing the earth. With such antennas, the on board amateur radio facilities could be extended to amateur TV. In 2003 the request was examined in detail and finally accepted. ARISS would pay for the development, manufacturing and qualification of the antennas. ESA would support the installation cost. ARISS-Europe started a funding campaign, all donations being published on the website. In 2004 coaxial feed throughs were installed on the port cone of Columbus. This was needed for accessing the antennas with feedlines from inside the module. In 2005, the Royal Belgian Amateur Radio Society (UBA) signed a contract with the Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland for the development and manufacturing of the antennas. Whereas initial plans were for UHF, L-band and S-band antennas, only L- and S-band antennas could be ordered by lack of funding. The cost of the project was 47.000 Euro. Early 2006 the antennas were delivered to ESA. Meanwhile main Columbus contractor EADS and subcontractor Alenia Spazio had reviewed mechanical and thermal constraints. Wroclaw University proceeded to qualifications tests (cost 3.000 Euro) and the antennas failed. In 2007 an additional contract was signed with the Wroclaw University for the development of modified antennas. This amounted to 36.000 Euro. These antennas were accepted and installed on Columbus, October 2007. The cost of the antennas finally amounted to 86.000 Euro and was covered by a wordwide funding campaign. ESA supported the total installation cost of the antennas, including feed throughs and coaxial cables. After the successful launch of Columbus and its integration into the International Space Station complex, an ARISS-Europe working group started a study for the development of an amateur television transmitter on Columbus, using one of the the S-band antennas. A debate started between the supporters of analog television (ATV) and the proponents of digital television (DATV). The working group, which met monthly per teleconference, made progress, but was stuck by the lack of funding. As time went by, the debate on ATV versus DATV evolved at the advantage of the latter, but no funding was in sight… Then, suddenly, supported by the enthusiasm of Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA, who had performed many ARISS school contacts during his 2010-2011 expedition aboard the Space Station, at the initiative of AMSAT Italia, an Italian manufacturer, Kayser Italia, presented a project for an amateur radio DATV transmitter to ESA’s educational services. In 2012, this proposal was accepted and ESA signed a contract with Kayser Italia for the development and the manufacturing of a DATV transmitter on S-band. This transmitter, dubbed “Ham Video, was installed on Columbus and ESA transferred the custodianship of this equipment to ARISS. It was a long way, spanning sixteen years, from the initial proposal to the first ever HamTV school contact. A new era opens for ground station operators, interested in receiving digital amateur television from the International Space Station. A technical challenge already met by a few ground stations in Europe, USA and Australia. Long life to HamTV and success to the pioneering ground stations, world wide!

ARISS contact planned for girls' school in Bristol, UK

Friday 19 February 2016, at approximately 14:23 UTC, an ARISS contact is planned for Oasis Academy Brightstowe, Bristol, United Kingdom.  The direct contact will be operated by GB1OAB.Signals from space will be audible over Western Europe on 145.800MHz narrowband FM.This contact will be webcast on the ARISS Principia website School presentation:Oasis Academy Brightstowe is an independent Academy for 11 - 16 year olds, located in Shirehampton, North Bristol. We opened in September 2008 in the state-of-the-art buildings of the former Portway School. Our facilities here are second to none, with an on-site restaurant, great sports facilities and a well-stocked Library.Oasis Academy Brightstowe was given £1.8million to develop a 21st century ICT capability, so students here have access to the very latest technology; including a fully equipped Library, access to Wi-Fi throughout the school, and a Virtual Learning Environment, designed to give students access to online learning provision.The Academy has one of the highest computer-per-student ratios of any school in the area (better than one between two students) and we encourage students to be competent with the use of computers and the internet in their lessons.The new technology is embraced by both staff and students and forms a key part of lesson planning and delivery. Interactive whiteboards are a feature of every classroom and teachers can instantly turn any workspace into an ICT suite using one of our eight portable laptop trolleys. Students will ask as many of the following questions as time allows.1. Emily (12): From my research, I have found out that you are taking part in 265 experiments. Which one is the most important for us here on Earth?2. Luke (15): In your opinion, will unmanned missions ever be equal to manned ones?3. Francesca (16): In a microgravity environment, can dust, debris and liquids cause a danger, and if so how do you deal with it?4. Seema (15): My aim is to be the first female Afghan astronaut. What would be the one most important piece of advice that you have for me?5. Jack (11): Were you told what experiments you had to do, or did you get to choose?6. Ashleigh (16): How many days supplies do you have on board should a resupply mission not would you potentially be able to live for, and how would you survive the longest?7. Lewis (16): How did you build the confidence to go into space?8. Natalie (16): Why should we continue to fund expensive space missions when we have more pressing problems on Earth?9. Nazain (18): If the world's leaders could see the earth from your current perspective, do you think there would be a better consensus to sort out the problems of the world?10. Kerys (10): Did anything in your previous career or experiences, prepare you for space?11. Jacob (9): Why did you want to become an astronaut?12. Emily (12): When you push on the wall of the space station behind you to move forward, does the space station move backwards due to the principle of conservation of momentum?13. Luke (15): What do you think of NASA's planned one way Mars mission, and would you go if given the opportunity?14. Francesca (16): Can you feel the ISS shake or wobble?15. Seema (15): Being in a microgravity environment causes a decrease in muscle mass and bone density. Other than exercise, what measures are you taking to protect your health?16. Jack (11): Considering that in space you are weightless and time has a different value, do you age at a different rate?17. Kerys (10): Astronauts go through such lengthy and intensive training for their journeys. Was there anything that you were not prepared for?18. Jacob (9): How are your experiments helping to save our Earth?19. Natalie (16): What do you miss about being on earth?20. Nazain (18): Other than the earth, can you tweet a picture of your favourite sight in space? ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers onboard the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology and learning.